Thursday, February 23, 2012

This N That

Reprove, Rebuke, Exhort
The Pyromaniacs explain 2 Timothy 4:2's "reprove, rebuke, exhort" verse.

What is a Pastor anymore?
Pastor Chris Gordon discusses "An office that should be held in high esteem by those who are privileged to serve in this capacity is being thrown to the dogs" and offers "a brief write-up on the warning signs of a pastor who has not been truly called by God to the office."

Russia Today report, "Firestorm Forecast: 'Syria can set region ablaze'"
Video discusses the current situation in Syria and whether intervention on humanitarian reasons should be entertained. But Syria and Russia say that intervention by the west would turn the region into a firestorm.

The Fireballs of February
NASA notes that though the number of observed fireballs is not any higher than usual, it is the appearance and trajectory that has them puzzled...

The sky actually IS falling, scientists find
Really. Scientists finished a decade long study, and clouds are lower.

Temporary RV occupancy
In a devastating indictment on how bad the economy has gotten, Board of Commissioners in my county took up the issue of how to deal with the explosive growth of people parking their RV's and living in them. As more people lose their homes, planting an RV on a cousin's pasture land and moving the family in seems to be the last option ahead of homelessness. Commissioners dealt with the issue first here, and then codified some ordinance and zoning rules about it here.

Metal theft getting ridiculous
In another local-to-me story, metal theft is hitting farmers hard. One farmer said, "Madison County’s Bill Sartain came back from church one day and found firemen at his house. A neighbor smelled gas and called 9-1-1. “We just thought it was a gas leak to start with and then we got to looking and someone had also been in the chicken house and stole a bunch of wire,” said Sartain. The crooks weren’t done. “They’ve been back since and stole more, and been back again and stole more,” said Sartain. “I put out game cameras to try to catch them and they stole them, too.”

Need a daily dose of Spurgeon? Devotionals here

World's oldest abstract art may be contained on a newly found Stone Age pebble. Sounds like a tempest in a  teapot to me.

Is your brain tired? Just want some cuteness? Innocuousness? Pleasant few minutes with no demands? Cute Overload!

6 comments :

  1. RE: Temporary RV Occupancy
    I rarely leave more than one comment on a blog on the same day, but this was like a proverbial carrot dangling in front of me.

    I was a Zoning Administrator/code enforcement officer for almost 8 years. I even wrote a couple zoning laws which are now recorded ordinances for our township. I do know how difficult it is for people to get by in these perilous times. Zoning laws like most other laws, are full of grey areas which are very loosely defined and therefore subject to interpretation usually first by the zoning enforcement official, and then by the planning/zoning commission if further clarification is warranted.

    I have read many different recreational vehicle/temporary residence zoning laws and have even provided the structure and wording for amendments to at least two. Although these types of ordinances may sound good, an ordinance is only as good as the zoning departments ability to enforce it. In plain English, everybody is happy until the rubber meets the road. As soon as the permit expires, when it is time to notify the property owner that the RV needs to be vacated from the property, that is if the property owner bothered to apply for a permit in the first place, all of a sudden..nobody is happy and it can become a very long drawn out process that creates an even harsher economic hardship on the person who is already having a hard time of it, not to mention the cost of litigation for the municipality who created a very hard to enforce ordinance in the first place.
    All in all, these situations seem to almost always land between a rock and a hard place..whether or not they are regulated, there will be more and more of this as times get harder. compassion and law are like lace and broken glass, they do not rub well. Unfortunately most counties will end up forgetting about the original intent of the laws they create and look at the revenue garnered from these properties to make their final legal stand. (which by the way any good attorney knows intent of the law is the only way to interpret the grey areas)....Sorry, but I did say this was a carrot! LOL.. I left the zoning enforcement career because it broke my heart over and over again by the way.
    ~God Bless~
    Lisa

    ReplyDelete
  2. Oh here I go again..Now I have to comment about the metal theft..When I was in Code Enforcement, I once witnessed people stealing a steel roof off of a foreclosed home! of course I called the authorities and the realtor who had the home listed. Also, I used to get calls which I forwarded to the Fire Marshal about people stealing rubber coated copper wires and then burning the rubber off in their backyards causing noxious fumes...People always called me first, even though I always told them to call the fire department first. Sheese! Now I will continue to the cuteness part of your post as my brain has become tired!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Hi Lisa,

    Your comment is very well stated. Thank you for taking the time to add to the issue. I agree, it is heartbreaking. I understand their intent, the Commissioners wanted to ensure a sanitary and electrically safe environment. But enforcement...oh, how I long to talk about enforcement.

    I used to be a reporter who covered zoning and planning meetings. I agree, it is so heartbreaking, because it involves people's domicile, the last bastion of privacy and safety and personal free will for any person. The government's balance of the personal privacy vs. safety and general welfare for all is a balance that is increasingly out of whack.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I liken it to psychology 101..Human nature dictates that the home is the only safe place in the world wherein we feel some semblance of complete control.
    After a few years, I figured out that if I initially met with property owners who were in violation of a code, it must be done in my office opposed to their home.
    The difference in their demeanor was like a lion and a kitten. Confronted at their home, (even though scheduled), mostly resulted in dealing with the lion. That same person sitting opposite me at my desk often became as a kitten.
    Even little old ladies!
    Oh how I do not miss that job!
    If only the government agencies would keep their focus on the intent for safety and welfare and not how to bring in more revenue at the expense of those who struggle. For example, most counties/townships do not like the idea of smaller, albeit (better built) residential buildings because more livable square footage translates into more tax revenue, so in our rural areas we often see larger homes pieced together with inferior materials or not even completed because the home owner ran out of money. A building like that will be taxed higher than a smaller completed structure.
    I have been interviewed by 3 newspaper reporters in my area about controversial zoning problems, that proved very discomforting for this introvert. (LOL)

    ReplyDelete
  5. The first two years we lived in Ukraine, back in the late 1990's, our city had planned rolling black-outs every day - 5 times per day, 2 hours each time. During one of those planned black-outs, someone stole the power cable for out whole apartment building. (google soviet apartment building to see what I'm talking about!) 5 floor building, 6 entrances, 4 apartments per floor, rough estimation of 240+/- people lived for more than a week with no power at all until enough money could be scraped together to buy a new connection cable. During those years, metal in cemetaries disappeared (including fencing, metal on headstones, tables, benches - anything with metal), manhole covers disappeared (from a trolleybus my husband witnessed an old babushka walking down the street all bent over, carrying a manhole cover on her back - was she going to sell it or was she going to cover a dangerous open hole near her flat??), we even saw a couple guys walking down the street with a metal light pole one day. Metal roofing, metal doors, anything metal was fair game. When the economy crashes, food is scarce, money is scarcer and you have to eat and/or provide for your children - anything and everything becomes 'fair game'. America has not yet tasted this kind of desperation - but she very well could within the next few years. It pays to plan ahead and be prepared as best as is possible for your circumstances. However - nothing is really safe because thieves do break in and steal. Only God can truly keep a person safe and provide his every need.
    PS - people who burn the rubber off copper wire are plain lazy! My father recycled legally obtained copper wire for years. He stripped the rubber off with a knife - simple, but can be time consuming and takes a bit of effort.

    ReplyDelete
  6. What do you think of this???
    http://www.youtube.com/user/dutchsinse#p/u/3/Bd0qAVI6x4Y

    ReplyDelete