Sunday, February 26, 2017

We live our lives in a waiting room

Life is a waiting room



It might seem strange to say this, but we are not living to live. Living is not the point of our living. Waiting is. We live while we're waiting.

For the grace of God has appeared, bringing salvation for all people, 12training us to renounce ungodliness and worldly passions, and to live self-controlled, upright, and godly lives in the present age, 13waiting for our blessed hope, the appearing of the glory of our great God and Savior Jesus Christ, (Titus 2:11-13).

Paul is giving Titus some instructions and reminders as to our duties as Christians, to be done while we wait.

Matthew Henry's Commentary on the Whole Bible reminds us also that this life is a preparatory for the one to come.
To look for the glories of another world, to which a sober, righteous, and godly life in this is preparative: Looking for that blessed hope, and the glorious appearing of the great God and our Saviour Jesus Christ. Hope, by a metonymy, is put for the thing hoped for, namely, heaven and the felicities thereof, called emphatically that hope, because it is the great thing we look and long and wait for; and a blessed hope, because, when attained, we shall be completely happy for ever.
In today's time it's not considered mature to speak of prophecy. I believe that's wrong. I believe that because so many verses stress that we are to look forward, to hope in His coming promises, to wait for His return. I can't think of a better encouragement than to dwell on His prophecies. This life is difficult. (John 16:33). It's full of evil people and seducers waxing worse and worse. (2 Timothy 3:13). It's full of disease, strife, challenge, and vigilance. (1 Corinthians 11:30, 2 Corinthians 12:7-10, Proverbs 28:25, Psalm 46:1,1 Peter 5:8).

We are being trained while we wait. But waiting is our task, our joy, our hope. We should look to His return for encouragement. He is the blessed hope!

Illustration by Chris Powers


2 comments:

  1. Thank-you, Elizabeth!

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  2. I believe it is the mature who speak of prophecy and seek to understand it. It seems those are the ones looking and longing for the return of Jesus. The immature don't want to hear of prophecy and things to come, for it speaks of their love of worldly pleasures and desire for their lives not to be interrupted.

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